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Latest News: News

Fuzzy Low-Carb Math
1/4/04

How Do You Know if You're a Good Candidate for Low-Carb?
1/4/04

Thinking About Mad Cows
1/4/04

More on Trans Fat
8/28/03

Playing Catch-Up
8/28/03

Order Books

 
Good Fat Books
The Good Fat Cookbook : Fran McCullough
 Fran's latest book, breaking into a new area.
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Low-Carb Books
The Low-Carb Cookbook : Fran McCullough
 Fran's original Low-Carb cookbook. Now available in paperback.
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Living Low-Carb : Fran McCullough
 The follow-up to the first.
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Protein Power : Michael R. Eades M.D. and Mary Dan Eades M.D.
 Not only did the Eades write the introduction to The Low-Carb Cookbook, but it was the basis for developing the cookbook. To understand the basic concepts of a low-carb diet this book is a must read.
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Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution : Richard K. Bernstein, M.D.
 This book takes on the idea of treating diabetes with the incorporation of the low-carb diet. Ben is treating his diabetes with the same basic guidelines that Dr. Bernstein outlines in this book. It really explains the mechanics behind diabetes and eating according to your body's needs.
New Revised edition.
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The Low-Carb Comfort Food Cookbook : Michael R. Eades, M.D., Mary Dan Eades, M.D., and Ursula Solom
 If soy protein powder, vital wheat gluten flour and whey protein powder don't sound like your idea of comfort food, you're not alone. But please take a look at this book: besides the baked goods with odd ingredients (which you'll probably have to mail order) there are a whole bunch of great low-carb recipes, like tuna crunch with pecans. You might even be enticed into making a quick batch of waffles, which can morph into cereal, bread crumbs, a pizza base, even French toast. If you're a baker or you feel deprived enough, you'll find loads of treats here, like cinnamon buns and pasta that you make yourself. There are also lots of good tips, such as: if you're travelling abroad, grab some Splenda tablets (not available here yet) - they don't have the carby bulking agent that's in the powder, so they have 1/5th the carb count.
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The South Beach Diet : Arthur Agatston, M.D.
 A cardiologist devised this diet, which is a mix of low-carb, low-fat, low-glycemic index, and low-calorie. The good doctor reports that cravings vanish after two weeks on this diet (though the patients telling their stories in the boxes say otherwise). Fat is restricted and some carbs (fruits and whole grains) are allowed, though the minute you start gaining weight you have to drop the carbs back. You're encouraged to snack (15 nuts) and Agatston insists you eat dessert (sugar-free gelatin or low-fat ricotta with flavorings) even on the restricted early phase of the diet.

The book seems to have been put together hastily, because there are some contradictions - don't eat beets because they have too much sugar/beets are low-glycemic so eat them; don't eat bananas/do try the frozen banana slices dipped into chocolate?.Although Agatston is fiercely against trans fats, he doesn't seem to know that they're in canola oil and butter substitutes, which he recommends. If you ignore the fats advice, this could be a good alternative if you're hitting the wall with low-carb dieting.
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Food/Nutritional Reference
The Complete Book of Food Counts : Corinne T. Netzer
 Netzer is the perfect pocket guide to carbs, calories, protein, cholesterol, sodium, fat and fiber.
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Bowes and Churche's Food Values of Portions Commonly Used : Jean A. T., Ph.D. Pennington, Anna De Planter Bowes, Helen Nichols Church
 Pennington (Bowes and Churche's') is the standard reference on food counts used by the professionals and it includes vitamin and mineral values. This is the most authoritative book on the subject - a book you'll use often when you have questions about what's going in your mouth.
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The Doctor's Complete Guide to Vitamins and Minerals : Dr. Mary Dan Eades, MD
 A quick guide by Dr. Mary Dan Eades for vitamins and minerals.
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Other Recommended Nutritional Books
Hypothyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness : Dr. Broda Barnes
 Insulin problems and hypothyroidism go hand in hand, and a sluggish thyroid gland often goes undetected, since the blood tests are not particularly accurate and the range is too broad in any case. To find out if you're hypothyroid, take your temperature in your armpit before getting out of bed in the morning - if it's low four days running, it's almost certian that's a problem for you. The best book on the subject is Dr. Barnes's very readable and understandable one. This disease affects so many parts of the body that it's essential (and very simple) to correct it.
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The Carnitine Miracle : Robert Crayhon
 The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. (M. Evans, $19.95). This is one of those eye-opening books that may end up changing your life. The subtitle is: The Supernutrient Program that Promotes High Energy, Fat Burning, Heart Health, Brain Wellness and Longevity. They left out immune system boosting, which is another of carnitine's little tricks, but I guess they had to stop somewhere. Carnitine turns out to be the missing piece in the diet world, the nutrient (which was thought to be an amino acid at one time, but isn't) that actually burns fat at the cellular level. If you don't have enough carnitine in your system, it doesn't matter how rigorously you diet, you just won't burn the fat. Add carnitine (which has no side effects) and bingo, the furnace ignites. You also gain the benefit of all that fat-burning, which is not only weight loss but a huge energy boost - in fact you need to take carnitine in the morning so it won't keep you from sleeping. Crayhon is a highly respected nutritionist and low-carb guru who is himself a former vegetarian (a group chronically low in carnitine, as are low-thyroid people, who tend to be overweight and have carb problems) who saw the light and realized he wasn't functioning at the optimal level of health. If you've hit a plateau, if your weight loss isn't what it should be according to your dietary compliance, if your energy is low, you really should check out this book.
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Robert Crayhon's Nutrition Made Simple : Robert Crayhon
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Dangerous Grains : James Braly, M.D. and Ron Hoggan, M.S.
 This fascinating book takes an extremely broad view of gluten sensitivity - it's not just for celiac disease anymore. In fact, the emaciated victim is rarer than the obese victim today, so lots of doctors miss this diagnosis. The problem is a genetic allergy to the protein gluten that's in grains as well as a defect in enzymes to deal with the protein. Gluten sensitivity has a profound relationship to huge numbers of diseases, everything from alopecia (hair loss) to migraines to early miscarriages, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer (because the gluten inactivates your killer cells, the main line of defense in the immune system). So it's serious stuff; if anyone in your family has insulin-dependent diabetes or celiac disease, you must read this book.

If you've been eating low-carb for a long time, gluten sensitivity testing won't give you an accurate result (in fact, some people think gluten sensitivity is so widespread that it's the main reason there are so many health benefits to low-carb diets.) If this IS your problem, though, you get to eat corn, rice, potatoes, and possibly even oats. A friend who's been obese for a very long time and tried virtually every other diet has been steadily losing a pound or two a week since she started gluten-free eating, and she's enjoying cornbread, cheesecake, and all sorts of other treats.
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The Metabolic Typing Diet : William Wolcott and Trish Fahey
 I'm a longtime believer in the idea that we're all metabolically different (and when I was an editor, I published one of the first books on the subject, George Watson's Nutrition and Your Mind.) This book builds on the work of many earlier researchers and its goal is to make you healthier - which will also make you lose weight if you need to and will give you high energy. You take a test (in the book) to determine your "type" - and of course most of us on this website will be protein types. We need not only lots of protein and can do with a quite a lot of fat, but there are some things to avoid that I, for one, love, and am used to having on a long-term low-carb diet: any form of alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, grapes, green peppers, raspberries, strawberries. These foods are okay if they're cooked, however, There's also some food combining elements to this diet. I haven't yet tried it, but I'm getting motivated - the idea of feeling great, losing whatever weight just won't come off no matter how low-carb you go, being in a state of your own optimal health - all this sounds really good.
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